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2 edition of Growth response of speckled alder and willow to depth of flooding found in the catalog.

Growth response of speckled alder and willow to depth of flooding

M. Dean Knighton

Growth response of speckled alder and willow to depth of flooding

by M. Dean Knighton

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  • 39 Currently reading

Published by North Central Forest Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in St. Paul, Minn .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Alder -- Wounds and injuries -- Minnesota.,
  • Alder -- Minnesota -- Growth,
  • Willows -- Wounds and injuries -- Minnesota.,
  • Willows -- Minnesota -- Growth

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 6

    StatementM. Dean Knighton
    SeriesUSDA Forest Service research paper NC -- 198
    ContributionsNorth Central Forest Experiment Station (Saint Paul, Minn.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination6 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13604154M

    Offers a fascinating landscape history of this six county region in east-central Minnesota, including detailed descriptions of the 39 varieties of native habita. EPA/// August IMPACTS ON QUALITY OF INLAND WETLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES: A SURVEY OF INDICATORS, TECHNIQUES, AND APPLICATIONS OF COMMUNITY-LEVEL BIOMONITORING DATA by: Paul R. Adamus NSI Technology Services Corporation US EPA Environmental Research Laboratory SW 35th St. Corvallis, OR and Karla Brandt Center .

    Unlike red alder, Sitka alder lost substantial root and shoot biomass and did not restore growth during. flooding (20 days) or. recovery. periods (10 days) (Batzli and Dawson, ). Others report that “ Sitka alder prefers moist, relatively well drained soils but will grow on sites ranging from submesic. to subhygric or possibly hygric. ”. GENERAL BOTANICAL CHARACTERISTICS: American hornbeam is a native, deciduous small tree. It usually grows 30 to 40 feet ( m) tall [4,13,32,39].The bark is thin, close, and usually smooth. The trunk is often crooked, and is usually coarsely fluted, resembling a flexed muscle [4,7,13].The fruit is a ribbed nutlet to inch ( mm) long [3,4].

    Flooding is associated with specific drainage and thaw depth classes (Tables (Tables3 3 and and4). 4). Alluvial deposition inhibits the formation of thick surface organic horizons and their associated shallow thaw (thaw class 1) and very poor drainage (drainage class 1; note the low cumulative binomial probability values for these drainage and.   The willow-tall shrub thicket can include three species of willow. Salix sericea Marsh. (Silky Willow), the most common species, occurs in wet ditches and along the margins of beaver ponds. Associated with Speckled Alder, S. discolor Muhl. (Glaucous Willow) is a relatively rare species known from small communities along Abe's and Glade Runs.


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Growth response of speckled alder and willow to depth of flooding by M. Dean Knighton Download PDF EPUB FB2

• Growth and survival of speckled alder and willow were determined • for two growing seasons with continuous flooding at different depths. Growth was at least four times greater when the water table was below the root crown than when it was 15 cm above.

Mortality ' increased with flooding depth and was greatest for alder. Growth and survival of speckled alder and willow were determined for two growing seasons with continuous flooding at different depths.

Growth was at least four times greater when the water table was below the root crown than when it was 15 cm above. Mortality increased with flooding depth and as greatest for by: 4. Growth response of speckled alder and willow to depth of flooding.

[Saint Paul, Minn.]: North Central Forest Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, (OCoLC) This species is best in moist sites and is able to tolerate short-term flooding. Disease, pests, and problems Potential problems include cankers, alder aphids, Japanese beetles, and leaf miners.

Native geographic location and habitat. C-Value: 8. Bark color and. Different responses of red and sitka alder to flooding serve as a partial explanation for the different patterns of distribution of these species and suggest some adaptations of red alder that.

Abstract. Alteration of natural flooding regimes can expose lowlands to waterlogged soil conditions during any month of the year.

The seasonality of flooding may have profound effects on the carbon and nitrogen budgets of N-fixing alders (Alnus spp.), and in turn, may impact the C and N economy of extensive alder-dominated, wetland ecosystems, including those dominated by speckled alder (Alnus.

Speckled alder (Alnus incana ssp. rugosa) is a characteristic species of scrub-shrub 1-type wetlands, the second most common wetland type in major watersheds of the Adirondack Mountains in New York ed alder is an actinorhizal nitrogen fixer that relies heavily on N 2 over soil N and fixes substantial amounts of nitrogen in wetlands, resulting in little vegetation processing of.

Alteration of natural flooding regimes can expose lowlands to waterlogged soil conditions during any month of the year. The seasonality of flooding may have profound effects on the carbon and nitrogen budgets of N-fixing alders (Alnus spp.), and in turn, may impact the C and N economy of extensive alder-dominated, wetland ecosystems, including those dominated by speckled alder (Alnus incana.

Stands were cut up to 56 years earlier. Pussy willow cover was greatest (3%) in speckled alder/deciduous leaf litter communities that dominated sites logged an average of years before.

Pussy willow cover averaged % on speckled alder/fir (Abies spp.)-black spruce/herb rich vegetation on sites logged an average of years earlier. Qualitatively, the flooding tolerance of willow is well known, and even supported by T.G.

WilliamsSpecies and clonal variation in growth responses to waterlogging and submersion in the genus Salix. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 98B (), pp. Growth response of speckled alder and willow to depth of flooding. The present study was conducted to evaluate the photosynthetic and growth responses of black willow to simulated herbivory and flooding.

and depth to the prevailing water table is a major. Six-year growth of Douglas-fir saplings after manual or herbicide release from coastal shrub competition. Growth response of speckled alder and willow to depth of flooding; Temporal effects of mechanical treatment on winter moose browse in south-central Alaska.

where GR, or growth ring (mm), is the annual radial growth of the sampled stem (black spruce, alder, birch, or willow) in anda is the intercept for the respective species, WT (cm) is the summer season average water table depth with respect to the surface, BD (cm) is the basal diameter of the corresponding stem, β 1, β 2 and β 3.

Ecological Site Name: Semiwet Streambank (Birch-Alder) Site Number: CYUT 4 Symbol Total Composition Low High Low High Water birch BEOC2 10 15 Yellow willow SALU2 5 10 Speckled alder ALIN2 72 3 5 Black hawthorn CRDO2. The depth of the river above the backwater of the Essex Junction dam varies from 3 to 6 feet during normal stages.

From there to the Winooski gorge the stream is deeper, with lower gradients and velocities and with sharp meandering bencls. This consisted mainly of willow and speckled alder (Alnus incana) with some elm, maple, and other hard.

Influence Of Flooding Duration On The Biomass Growth Of Alder And Willow Lewis F. Ohmann, M. Dean Knighton, and Ronald McRoberts INTRODUCTION willows (Knighton ). This pointedto a need for more basic information on the response of alder and Speckled alder (Alnus rugosa (Du Roi) Spreng.) and willow to water level changes, so that impoundment.

Burgason, Barry N. Prescribed burning for management of hawthorn and alder. New York Fish and Game Journal. 23(2): [] Butler, C. Summer food utilization and observations of a tame moose Alces alces. Canadian Field-Naturalist.

[] Chrosciewicz, Z. Ecological Site Name: Wet Fresh Streambank (Willow) Site Number: XYUT 3 1. Potential Plant Community Description and Ecological Factors The general view of this site is a willow–alder canopy with grasses and grass-like plants in wetter more open areas.

Many of. Growth rate: fast Texture: medium 1. This document is adapted from Fact Sheet ST, a series of the Environmental Horticulture Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.

Publication date: November 2. Dean Knighton has written: 'Growth response of speckled alder and willow to depth of flooding' -- subject(s): Growth, Alder, Willows, Wounds and injuries 'Sulphur content of upland and wetland.

Growth and development have introduced an increasing number of non-native and invasive plant species into our ecological network. Lancaster County’s Pennsylvania Native Tree and Shrub guide has been developed to increase the understanding and awareness of residents and officials of the.These plants have adapted to anaerobic soil conditions by evolving alternative methods of collecting oxygen such as the hypertrophied lenticels in the bark of speckled alder; the hollow stems of rush and grass species; and the air filled cells (aerenchyma) in the roots of cattails.

Cattails. Plant species vary in their tolerance of wetland.Figure 14a. Plant seedlings to the same depth they grew in the nursery. Look for the root collar as pointed out in this image and plant to that depth.

Photo by G. Gilmore. Figure 14b. While planting, keep seedling roots moist by carrying them in a bucket of muddy water. Planting Seedlings.